Tag Archives: WJCT

WJCT Announced As Member Of National Climate Coverage Collaborative

The Local Media Association has announced 22 news outlets from across the country, including Jacksonville’s own WJCT News 89.9 and WJCT News partner News4Jax, that will be participating in its new Covering Climate Collaborative. WJCT produces ADAPT, a digital magazine focused on how climate change is impacting Northeast Florida and what’s being done about it, and the ADAPT Newsletter. 

This new collaboration will help participating newsrooms focus on covering the local impacts of climate change and how communities are responding to it.

“We’re thrilled to announce this group of newsrooms that are recognized for their commitment to reporting locally on the impacts of climate change,” said Frank Mungeam, chief information officer for the Local Media Association (LMA), one of the largest local media trade associations in North America. “This collaboration brings together newsrooms with diverse platform expertise — from print to digital to audio and video — and represents key regions directly affected by our changing climate.”

The partners are grouped into five regional hubs:

East/Southeast

  • Florida: WJCT Public Media, WJXT-TV, The Miami Herald, WKMG-TV Orlando and Florida International University’s South Florida Media Network
  • North Carolina: The News & Observer
  • South Carolina: The Post & Courier

Gulf Coast

  • Louisiana: The Times Picayune and WWNO/WRKF Radio
  • Texas: KPRC-TV Houston and KSAT-TV San Antonio

Great Lakes

  • Illinois: WBEZ Chicago
  • Michigan: Great Lakes Echoat Michigan State University, Planet Detroitand WDIV-TV

Southwest

  • Arizona: ABC15-TV Phoenix
  • New Mexico: The Paper (Albuquerque) and NMPBS Public Radio

West

  • California: The Sacramento Bee, KGO-TV San Francisco and Southern California Public Radio
  • Washington: Investigate West

Journalists from these news outlets will focus on the major threats climate change poses to their region, collaborating on local coverage and exchanging content with other members, both in their region and from across the country.

For more information, please see WJCT’s website.

WJCT-TV is now JAX PBS

The world is constantly changing and reshaping the way we deliver information. The programs that currently air on WJCT-TV are now available on platforms beyond the broadcast television channel, and its new name reflects this new multi-platform environment.

WJCT-TV has rebranded as Jax PBS, as of February 24, 2021.

As WJCT Public Media continues to move toward production and distribution of its services across a wide range of digital technologies, its brands are also evolving to reflect this new media landscape.

For more than 60 years, the WJCT-TV call letters signaled to the Northeast Florida community that we are your trusted source for the very best in education, entertainment and television news programming. Although we’ve got a new name and fresh look, we continue to connect with audiences with the same mission to educate, involve and inspire!

A nonprofit model is emerging for local news

By David McGowan, President and CEO, WJCT Public Media

The recent round of staff buyouts affecting The Florida Times-Union newsroom provided the latest evidence, if any were needed, that the business model of local newspapers is fundamentally broken.

COVID-19 is playing the role of accelerant on a raging fire initially brought on by changing news consumption habits, an over-reliance on advertising and a reluctance or inability to change. The hedge fund and private equity-driven nature of today’s newspaper ownership groups is also a factor, but the consolidation of declining industries usually attracts a certain ruthlessness.

Despite its staff losses, the Times-Union’s newsroom has shown how valuable courageous, enterprising journalism can be to a community. Under the leadership of Editor Mary Kelli Palka, the T-U, a WJCT News partner, has both broken and doggedly pursued stories that have had real and measurable impact. From JEA to Lot J and lots of other stories, the T-U has engaged us all in the civic life of this region in ways large and small that many readers have come to take for granted. It’s also worth remembering that many of these lines of inquiry were not very popular when investigative reporters began them.

But as papers decline, and evidence continues to mount that the crisis in local journalism is having a wide range of negative effects on American public life, new and innovative solutions are being found as local communities rise to meet the challenge. Nonprofit online news services, often working collaboratively with the for-profit newsrooms in their regions, are emerging at a rapid pace.

The Institute for Non-Profit News reports that there are now more than 250 nonprofit newsrooms across the country, and their growth has been steady. Though these newsrooms now employ only a fraction of the more than 28,000 journalism jobs lost from 2008 to 2018, the sector demonstrates increasing levels of impact and sustainability. Importantly, over 40 percent of revenues to the Institute for Non-Profit News members serving local audiences now come from individual supporters.

The growth in local nonprofit digital news comes as the Pew Research Center found that in 2018, roughly 40 percent of adults preferred to get their local news from online sources, with more than three-quarters (77 percent) saying the internet is important in how they receive local news. This squares with WJCT’s own research in 2018, which found that most locals would prefer new local coverage to be offered online. If trends continue at the current pace, online sources are set to become Americans’ top choice for local news, supplanting local TV news broadcasts, within the next year or two.

At WJCT we have been working hard to ensure that we can drive this exciting nonprofit and digital future for local journalism. Not only are we devoting more radio air time to local news than ever — having recently made WJCT News 89.9 into an all-news and talk station — but we’ve also invested in creating a set of online products like ADAPT (adaptflorida.org) that point in the direction we’re headed.

Now, thanks to significant support from The Arthur Vining Davis Foundation (a national foundation with its headquarters in Jacksonville), we’re embarking on an expansion of our newsroom that will enable us to begin to build the kind of reporting resources necessary to cover the region more effectively while meeting audiences in new ways.

We approach this task with both determination and humility, and with the knowledge that no single local news organization can give this community all of the quality journalism it deserves. But as the region’s leading user-supported nonprofit news provider, we embrace the moment and all that it requires of us.

Originally published by the Florida Times-Union

WJCT to Convert 89.9 FM to All News/Talk Format and Change Name on July 13, 2020

Conversion will expand local journalism and bring 13 new shows to Northeast Florida airwaves; station will be known as WJCT News 89.9

Jacksonville, Fla. – June 4, 2020 – WJCT today announced it will convert 89.9 FM, its flagship radio station, to an all news/talk format, and the station will be identified as WJCT News 89.9 effective July 13, 2020.

This conversion will expand WJCT’s local journalism with additional midday newscasts of local reporting by the organization’s news team. Thirteen new national programs from a range of producers will also be added to the station’s weekly schedule.

This announcement follows a period of sustained audience growth across all of WJCT News’ platforms, including on 89.9 FM, online at wjct.org and on the WJCT app. WJCT News covers stories throughout Northeast Florida; shares breaking news from partner news outlets such as The Florida Times-Union, News4Jax and the Jacksonville Daily Record; and produces original digital media such as the magazine ADAPT and the Odd Ball and VOIDCAST podcasts.

The average number of weekly listeners consuming news has continued to grow recently, the continuation of a long-term trend. WJCT anticipates further growth across its platforms, as consumers seek trustworthy coverage of topics of local and national importance like the coronavirus, hurricane season and the 2020 election season.

“The growing need for sources of news and information that are deeply thoughtful, unfailing in the pursuit of truth and universally available has never been clearer than it is now,” said David McGowan, President & CEO of WJCT. “The Jacksonville area in Northeast Florida, a region with an ever-more diverse citizenry, requires a healthy range of news sources to inform critical decisions about our shared future.”

New programs coming to 89.9 FM starting July 13 include the following; to view the updated schedule, visit wjct.org/radiopreview:

  • PBS NewsHour from PBSevery Monday through Friday at 9 p.m.
  • Thinfrom KERA in Texas, every Monday through Friday at 10 p.m.
  • 1A Plus from WAMU in Washington and NPR, every Monday through Friday at midnight
  • The Pulse from WHYY in Philadelphia, Fridays at 2 a.m., and Sundays at 10 p.m. and 2 a.m.
  • Innovation Hub from PRX and WGBH in Boston, Saturdays at 4 a.m. and 11 p.m.
  • Science Friday Weekend from WNYC in New York, Saturdays at 4 p.m. and Sundays at 8 p.m.
  • Fresh Air Weekend from NPRSaturdays at 7 p.m.
  • New Yorker Radio Hour from The New Yorker and WNYC in New York, Saturdays at 8 p.m., midnight and 3 a.m., and Sundays at 10 a.m.
  • PRX’s Remix Select from PRX, Saturdays at 9 p.m.
  • Podcast Playlist from CBC in Canada, Saturdays at 10 p.m.
  • It’s Been a Minute from NPRSaturdays at noon and 1 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.
  • With Good Reason from Virginia Humanities in Virginia, Sundays at 11:30 p.m.
  • Climate One from PRX, Sundays at midnight

Music programs such as Jazz Night in America with Christian McBride and Live from Herewith Chris Thile will air Sunday nights at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m., respectively, on Electro Lounge Radio on 89.9 HD4: a new HD radio station launched by WJCT in April 2020 as part of the Jacksonville Music Experience (JME). Additional elements of the Jacksonville Music Experience include Classical 24® from American Public Media on 89.9 HD2; Anthology, a hand-crafted selection of music from the 60s, 70s, and 80s on 89.9 HD3; Music Thursdays on WJCT-TV; Studio 5 Sessions at wjct.org; the VOIDCAST podcast, produced in partnership with Void Magazine; and live performances at the WJCT Soundstage. Details about the Jacksonville Music Experience are available at wjct.org/jaxmusic.

###

About WJCT:
WJCT is the community-owned and operated public media organization serving Jacksonville and the First Coast since 1958, using television, radio, digital media, and live events to help community members learn, share, and grow. For more information on WJCT’s in-depth programming content, log on to WJCT Online at wjct.org. Like WJCT on Facebook and follow WJCT on Twitter and Instagram.

90.7 WMFE BEGINS COLLABORATION WITH INSIDECLIMATE NEWS

ORLANDO – 90.7 WMFE has begun an ongoing collaboration with InsideClimate News, a Pulitzer Prize-winning, non-profit, non-partisan news organization dedicated to covering climate change, energy and the environment. WJCT Public Media in Jacksonville also participates in the collaborative.

WMFE environmental reporter Amy Green is a part of ICN’s new project Caught Off Guard: The Southeast Struggles with Climate Change, which features Southeast reporters’ stories on the progress and problems their communities face related to climate change. Journalists from nine newsrooms found communities struggling with funding or a lack of political will, and an urgent need for technological breakthroughs to meet global warming head-on.

Green’s story, Orlando Aims High With Emissions Cuts, Despite Uncertain Path, focuses on the city of Orlando’s promise to achieve 100% clean energy by 2050.

“As its population grows, the Southeast region is facing some of the biggest global warming threats in the United States. And it’s having a hard time rising to that challenge,” ICN Southeast reporter James Bruggers wrote. “We’re proud to bring you these stories, and proud of our work to revive and strengthen local environmental journalism.”

WMFE is part of the Southeast hub of ICN’s national environmental reporting network. The other members are fellow Florida station WJCT Public Media in Jacksonville, Raleigh News and Observer, West Virginia Public Broadcasting/Ohio Valley Resource, The Post and Courier, The State, BirminghamWatch, Georgia Public Broadcasting and WFAE.

WMFE is also part of the Florida Climate Reporting Network, a multi-newsroom initiative founded by the Miami Herald, the South Florida Sun Sentinel, The Palm Beach Post, the Orlando Sentinel, WLRN Public Media and the Tampa Bay Times to report about climate change.

Green shared her Orlando emissions story with the Florida network, and the Orlando Sentinel published it in their print edition on Jan. 27.

WJCT Launches ADAPT Podcast, New Edition Profiling 6 On Front Line Of Climate Change

Nesheiwat at lectern

State Resilience Officer Julia Nesheiwat speaks at an American Water Resources Association meeting in Ponte Vedra Beach in November of 2019.
BRENDAN RIVERS / ADAPT/WJCT NEWS

The newest edition of ADAPT, published Monday by WJCT Public Media, introduces a six-part podcast and web series profiling people working every day to help communities across the First Coast adapt to climate change and sea level rise.

Podcast guests range from Florida’s first-ever chief resilience officer to an environmental psychologist who teaches people how to talk about climate change more effectively.

Podcast host Brendan Rivers’ conversation with Florida’s Chief Resilience Officer Julia Nesheiwat marks her first one-on-one interview with a reporter since she was appointed in August. Nesheiwat shares the lessons she brings to the position from her time in the military and academia — and the time she created a federal bureau from the ground up.

“It’s too expensive to go at it alone,” she says in the ADAPT podcast. “We really need to collaborate.”

The other podcast guests are:

  • Adam Rosenblatt, a biology professor at the University of North Florida who breaks down the science of climate change and shares details about his advocacy efforts on the local, state and national level. Rosenblatt believes, “Doing more climate science is not going to solve the problem. We need to convince people to take action.”
  • Lauren Watkins, an environmental psychologist who teaches people how to have productive, non-polarizing conversations about environmental issues. She opens up her toolkit for us  — and opens up about the communication challenges in her own family.
  • Richard Leon, Jacksonville’s Urban Forestry Manager, who says, “Half the city thinks I’m a tree butcher. The other half thinks I’m a tree hugger.” He sees trees as critical urban infrastructure and plans to plant as many as possible in the nation’s biggest city.
  • Shane Corbin, City Manager for Atlantic Beach, who discusses the LEED certification (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) process that the entire city of Atlantic Beach undertook last year.
  • Sean Lahav, a 24-year-old who serves the Northeast Florida Regional Council as a Resiliency Coordinator. His job includes getting “movers and shakers” from the private sector to think about incorporating sea level rise into their plans. “Around the state of Florida, there’s a lot of momentum right now — in Jacksonville and elsewhere,” he said.

ADAPT is a digital-first publication at adaptflorida.org, devoted to researching, reporting, and engaging citizens on the many issues involved in adaptation to sea level rise across Northeast Florida.  All six episodes of the ADAPT podcast series are available at adaptflorida.org and on all major podcast platforms.

In Florida, two-thirds of citizens rarely or never discuss climate change, and 67% say they hear about climate change in the media about once a month or less, according to polling data from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication.

“These poll results are disheartening, but as a journalist who covers climate change, I see an opportunity. With this special edition of ADAPT and the podcast, we at WJCT are trying to provide our readers and listeners with the tools they need to confidently and effectively talk about the most pressing issue of our time,” explained ADAPT reporter Brendan Rivers.

The first edition of ADAPT, published in June 2019, included original reporting about the effects of climate change on everything from endangered species to drinking water, coastal economies and the U.S. Navy, as well as curated stories about what’s happening in other places.

To sign up to receive notice of future editions, visit adaptflorida.org/sign-up/.

The public is also invited to talk with climate change experts and hear what they can do, collectively, to deal with rising waters at WJCT’s annual ADAPT Summit at WJCT Studios on June 4, 2020.

50 Public Media Stations Receive CPB Education Planning Grants

$10,000 Seed Grants to Spur Education Innovation

Jun 14, 2018

(WASHINGTON, D.C. – June 14, 2018) – The Corporation for Public Broadcasting has awarded $500,000 to 50 public media stations across the country to explore innovative education programs. The grants of $10,000 per station will help fund research and planning, a crucial first step for stations to assess local needs and opportunities and to innovate on a local level.

“Through these pilot grants, we want stations to consider innovative ways to use media to meet pressing educational needs in their communities,” said Deb Sanchez, CPB senior vice president, education and children’s content. “The needs assessment and planning process will give stations the opportunity to discover today’s teaching and learning challenges and how public media can serve as a trusted educational media partner to serve their communities.”

CPB announced the grant opportunity at the Public Media Thought Leader Forum, at the 2018 National Educational Telecommunications Association (NETA) conference in January. Forum speakers inspired public media leaders to think about their education work in new and different ways. For example, Michael Horn of the Clayton Christensen Institute challenged stations to identify individual needs when developing educational content, as well as service and engagement strategies to better connect resources to those individuals.

The 50 stations receiving grants include public television and radio stations as well as joint licensees of all sizes, including WNET in New York City, New England Public Radio, KRWG in Las Cruces, N.M., and a collaboration between East Tennessee PBS and WUOT-FM. CPB will supplement the grants with professional learning activities, including an in-person meeting, needs assessments and personalized technical assistance, and a series of webinars showcasing tools and processes stations can use to build and implement a new vision of their education service. After six months, participating stations should have a fully developed project or service that they can bring to CPB or other partners for funding.

The stations include the following, alphabetically by state:

  • KHSU-FM, Arcata, Calif.
  • PBS SoCal, Costa Mesa, Calif.
  • Rocky Mountain PBS, Denver, Colo.
  • Connecticut Public, Hartford, Conn.
  • WJCT, Jacksonville, Fla.
  • WUCF-TV, Orlando, Fla.
  • WMFE-FM, Orlando, Fla.
  • WFSU, Tallahassee, Fla.
  • WUSF, Tampa, Fla.
  • Iowa Public Television, Johnston, Iowa
  • Idaho Public Television, Boise, Idaho
  • WKU Public Broadcasting, Bowling Green. Ky.
  • Louisiana Public Broadcasting, Baton Rouge, La.
  • WGBY, Springfield, Mass.
  • New England Public Radio, Springfield, Mass.
  • Maryland Public Television, Owings Mills, Md.
  • WKAR, East Lansing, Mich.
  • WGVU, Grand Rapids, Mich.
  • Detroit Public Television, Wixom, Mich.
  • WCMU Public Media, Mount Pleasant, Mich.
  • Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, Minn.
  • KCPT, Kansas City, Mo.
  • Nine Network of Public Media, St. Louis, Mo.
  • Montana PBS, Bozeman, Mont.
  • UNC-TV, Research/Triangle Park, N.C.
  • Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D.
  • KRWG, Las Cruces, N.M.
  • Vegas PBS, Las Vegas, Nev.
  • WSKG, Binghamton, N.Y.
  • WNED/WBFO-FM, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • WCNY/Public Broadcasting Council of Central New York, Syracuse, N.Y.
  • WNET/Educational Broadcasting Corporation, New York City, N.Y.
  • WMHT, Troy, N.Y.
  • WPBS, Watertown, N.Y.
  • WGTE, Toledo, Ohio
  • Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  • WLVT-TV, Bethlehem, Pa.
  • WQED, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  • WVIA, Pittston, Pa.
  • WHYY, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • WPSU, University Park, Pa.
  • WSBE/Rhode Island PBS, Providence, R.I.
  • WCTE, Cookeville, Tenn.
  • East Tennessee PBS/WUOT-FM, Knoxville, Tenn.
  • Nashville Public Television, Nashville, Tenn.
  • Panhandle PBS, Amarillo, Texas
  • KERA, Dallas, Texas
  • KLRU, Austin, Texas
  • KUEN, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • WHRO Public Media, Norfolk, Va.

 

About CPB:
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), a private, nonprofit corporation created by Congress in 1967, is the steward of the federal government’s investment in public broadcasting. It helps support the operations of nearly 1,500 locally owned and operated public television and radio stations nationwide. CPB is also the largest single source of funding for research, technology, and program development for public radio, television, and related online services. For more information, visit www.cpb.org and follow us on Twitter @CPBmediaFacebookLinkedIn, and subscribe for other updates.

The King of the Waves: WJCT’s David McGowan

He [McGowan] repeatedly mentions the need to increase WJCT’s metabolism, especially in the digital landscape.

“We must work to apply the resources that will allow us to continue to do more of the work and make us more valuable to all of the different communities in our footprint.”

“Whether we want it or not, we have a greater control today over how we consume media,” McGowan says. “One of my biggest jobs [at WJCT] is to make sure that we are as available, relevant and innovative today and tomorrow as we were yesterday.”

You can read the entire (Josue Cruz) profile of WCJT’s new president and CEO in Folio Weekly Magazine here.